10.17.19

On our environment: Sue Anderson

Join the foundation’s $50K match for 2019: if you make a grant or contribution to the Environmental Trust (our field of interest fund that helps Boulder County environmental organizations), your gift will be doubled...thanks to a donor who wants to inspire our community in supporting the amazing organizations serving the environment, right here where we live.
 

For Sue Anderson – a farmer, nonprofit consultant, Community Foundation fundholder, and Vice Chair of the foundation’s Board of Trustees – the Environmental Affinity Group (EAG) is a springboard for action.

 
“I think it’s really important that the Community Foundation is a place where donors and other community members can learn about local environmental issues, and how their resources can make a difference,” says Sue. “Climate change is daily, headline news – more than ever, we really need to think about how to reverse course for our planet.
 
“To do that, it takes not only political will, it takes philanthropists coming together to change the trajectory, and to pool and leverage their resources where they’re most needed.”
 
Indeed, for donors of the Community Foundation whose philanthropy is focused on protecting and promoting our shared environment, the EAG inspires connections and engagement around environmental issues, and provides opportunities for effective grantmaking. 
 
Coming up on Oct. 21, the EAG is hosting a seminar – The Power and Promise of Healthy Soil and Regenerative Agriculture in Boulder County – for those interested in learning more about healthy soil efforts in our region, including the science behind the power of healthy soil to draw down carbon to fight climate change, improve biodiversity and pollinator habitats, and increase the nutritional value of our food. The agenda features local leaders of the healthy soil movement, including Brett KenCairn, the City of Boulder’s Senior Policy Advisor for Climate, Sustainability, and Resilience; the event further includes a screening of “The Biggest Little Farm,” 2019 winner of the Boulder International Film Festival. Tickets to the screening are still available here
 
“When we talk about soil health, we mean both large-scale agriculture and what individuals can do on a smaller scale in their own backyards,” continues Sue. “We need to connect the dots more clearly, and really show people how healthy soil is one of many solutions to climate change. 
 
“Agriculture has been a contributor to climate change, but it can also be part of the solution. We need to change the ways in which agriculture contributes to environmental degradation – think plows and emissions, toxic pesticides, the implications of tilling land over and over again – by shifting our focus to environmental preservation.
 
“Healthy soil holds water and leads to better food. Healthy soil sequesters carbon, supports pollinators, and more. We need to think about these connections when we think about what increased soil health can do. And we need to work together, and combine our financial and intellectual resources … also to develop models that can be applied elsewhere, as we’ve done with other climate-related issues.
 
"If we can help lead the way in agriculture, we should aim for that.”
 
Alas, Sue reminds us that environmental giving across the country and around the world isn’t nearly what it should be. In our new TRENDS Report, learn more about the persistent problems and positive actions being taken to preserve and advance our local environment, and join the foundation’s $50K match for 2019: if you make a grant or contribution to the Environmental Trust (our field of interest fund that helps Boulder County environmental organizations), your gift will be doubled...thanks to a donor who wants to inspire our community in supporting the amazing organizations serving the environment, right here where we live.